Literacy Solutions Blog

The Daily Write

Sunday, 4 March 2018 at 6:40 pm

‘The Daily Write’ – A book of writing prompts for teachers of Years 2-6.

The Daily Write is a 48 page publication containing stimulus pictures with accompanying writing prompts, suitable for individual, or whole class use. The book is printed in full colour to enable teachers to remove and laminate pages and store as part of a classroom learning centre if desired.

Daily writing, even for …

The Background: Where did the ideas originate?

Wednesday, 15 November 2017 at 11:11 am

Cheerful Pens, Mastery Circuit, Sliding Cards, The Reading Wall, (Higher yield) Reading Stamina and Peer Tutoring

This is for those who’ve asked, formally and informally over the years. Our conversations have been short and often rushed. In workshops and consulting, the focus is on teaching or demonstrating the strategies, but time never permits a fuller explanation about where the ideas originated and what underpins them. As …

Mastery Circuit (Hardwiring, or overlearning essential subskills)

Tuesday, 14 November 2017 at 7:49 am

The Mastery Circuit was inspired by learnings in education, psychology, neuroscience and marketing … But mostly by Dame Marie Clay and her insistence that hard to teach students must overlearn one element every day while participating in the Reading Recovery Program.

Though this idea does not guarantee memory of subskills for all learners 1, it is highly effective for many. Background notes for this strategy are …

Easy, fun strategies for teaching reading and writing . . .
An introduction

Sunday, 22 October 2017 at 8:11 pm

Hi All

I hope you’ve been well and enjoying a productive year. It’s been ages since I posted. As some of you know, our blog had been taken down. Thank you to Glenda who advised our blog had been spammed with inappropriate material. This has only just been resolved and we’re back in action. As a result, I have a number of entries from earlier this …

Problem/Solution (Part 7 of 7)

Tuesday, 14 June 2016 at 10:21 am

In problem/solution texts, the author presents a problem and one or more potential solutions. Only one significant problem and solution may be presented in simpler texts. In longer, more complex texts there may be one main or overarching problem, in addition to one or multiple smaller complications, all or most of which are usually resolved. Some texts feature multiple complications which together create one main …

List/Description (Part 6 of 7)

Sunday, 5 June 2016 at 10:57 am

In a description the author describes, lists, explains or highlights attributes, features and characteristics of people, things or places. In body paragraphs there may be one main, or central idea, which can be identified by locating a topic sentence or summary sentence, or by inferring a connection between ideas across sentences. Examples, analogies, explanations or elaborations provide details about the significant idea. A description, …

Compare/Contrast (Part 5 of 7)

Monday, 30 May 2016 at 7:50 am

When comparing/contrasting an author shows how two or more elements are alike and different. When the items are compared, their similarities are explored; when they are contrasted, their differences are highlighted. Some texts only compare and are therefore comparing texts; some texts only contrast and are therefore contrasting texts.  Texts which do both are considered compare and contrast.

Signal words:

advantage, although, as opposed to, as well …

Cause/Effect (Part 4 of 7)

Thursday, 19 May 2016 at 7:59 am

Cause/Effect is used to show how one thing causes another thing to happen, or how more than one thing occurs as a consequence. A cause may result in one, or many effects. Therefore, causal relationships can be simple or complex.

Within paragraphs, an author may choose to give reasons which explain why something happened; he or she is explaining the effect or effects of a cause. …

Chronological/Time-Order Sequence (Part 3 of 7)

Tuesday, 10 May 2016 at 8:53 pm

In a chronological sequence the author uses the order of events, or chronology, to inform readers about events or content. The events may be organised by time or date, by arranging events as a series of steps or by following a list-like structure. Chronological sequencing is commonly used in nonfiction texts. In nonfiction, there are usually clear time markers such as dates or times of …

Top Level Structure (Part 2 of 7)

Wednesday, 4 May 2016 at 9:41 am

Graphic Organisers: Part 2 of 7

Top-Level Structures (T.L.S.) are cognitive frameworks which help us to organise information. Put simply, they are frameworks for organising ideas to make them easier to understand, notice relationships between and across ideas or elements and for categorising and integrating new information with what is already known. In reading, top-level structures help us to make sense of an author’s ideas; in …